ABOUT

unnamed-3Farida was born to Bengali parents who immigrated to the United Kingdom in the 1970’s, and is now the mother of two children; Essence Kaya and Tihami. Farida grew up on a council estate in Tottenham, North London, and this diverse background introduced her to a variety of cultures and social challenges at an early age. It was these childhood experiences that formed her identity and shaped her understanding of the world…

Motivated by the desire to understand and explore her own hybrid identity, Farida became captivated with the study of culture and she graduated with a B.A in Media and Cultural Studies in 2005. Farida intended to pursue a career in creative writing and investigative journalism, however she became pregnant during her final year of university, and the birth of her daughter forced her to place her writing career on hold and instead find a more suitable job that would accommodate family life. Following in the footsteps of her mother, who had worked in Tower Hamlets supporting Bengali women suffering from domestic abuse and mental health problems, Farida fell into the world of social care. She has been practising for ten years as a Family Support Worker supporting vulnerable families experiencing a range of social, economic, emotional and physical challenges. Farida is also a qualified counsellor and completed a Diploma in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy.

At the age of 15 Farida won an award from Poet Laureate Roger McGough for her poem ‘Millennium Bug.’ Subsequently the poem was published in an anthology called ‘The Future Voices of Middlesex.’ In 2013 she won the title of Best Poet UK at the UK Unsigned Hype awards, and wrote a poem called ‘Survived’ for a short film raising awareness about child abuse. In 2015 her poetry video ‘Seven Days,’ which she produced and directed won the runner-up prize at the Haringey 50th Anniversary Film competition. Farida has performed across the country including at prestigious venues such as the BAFTA, Fairfield Halls and Queen Elizabeth Park.

Farida’s unique style of poetry infuses clever wordplay with music. The music has a distinctive character and compliments the poetic form of story-telling. She states that both elements are equally as important and therefore she composes and produces the majority of the music accompanying her poems.

The reality of the dark side of society and her own trials and tribulations inspire the bitter sweet stories of human connection and spirit depicted in Farida’s words. Her poems are described as ‘Poetic Stories’ that provide a social commentary of the unheard voices of contemporary multi-cultural society. Farida uses poetry to discuss how culture, history, politics and economy impact on collective norms and expectations, and manipulate individual identity. Through the play and formation of words, she can examine a range of topics such as social inequality, the challenges of contemporary society, love, heartbreak, betrayal and inner conflict…

Farida will release her debut poetry book and poetry album both entitled ‘Invisible Tattoos’ in September 2016.